Search Results for bars

These are the search results for: bars
May 5th, 2014 by HarlemGuy

harlem park to park

For the second year in a row, top bars from across Harlem and Washington Heights/Inwood to compete for Title of “Best Uptown Bartender”

Mixologists from 30 of New York City’s best uptown bars from Harlem and Washington Heights/Inwood will try to wow bar goers between May 5th and 15th with delectable and original cocktails featuring sponsor spirit brands Hennessy V.S and Hendricks Gin.

uptown-battle-of-the-bars 2

The Uptown Battle of the Bars is presented by Harlem Park to Park, a community improvement association in Central Harlem, and produced by Good Ice Marketing.

Participating bartenders will create signature original cocktails using their choice of ingredients, along with the featured spirits. Cocktails will be available to sample on Monday, May 5 and Monday, May 12th, between 6-10 pm at a special $8 discounted price. Visitors will have the opportunity to vote online from May 5 through the 15th at Instagram @UptownBattle for their favorite cocktail.

The bartenders from the top 12 bars with the highest votes will advance to compete for the title of Best Uptown Bartender at a showdown VIP finale event on May 19, from 6-10 pm, at Harlem Tavern on Frederick Douglas Blvd at 116th Street. At the final showdown, industry and celebrity judges, along with the audience, will taste creations by the mixologists featuring Hennessy V.S and Hendricks Gin.

The Showdown Finale includes 3 rounds of competition. In the first round the bartenders will have 10 minutes to create a cocktail using Hennessy V.S. For the second round, first round finalists will compete to create cocktails using Hendricks Gin. For the last round, the final 2 bartenders, with the assistance of fellow competitors, will use surprise secret ingredients — á la “Chopped” — to create original cocktails, using either of the 2 spirits for the winning title. Drinks will be judged on creativity, taste/complexity, originality and their crowd pleasing factor. Music will be provided by Dj Stormin’ Norman of Sundae Sermon.

“Harlem’s nightlife and bar scene has developed tremendously in the complexity and originality of offerings and concepts. From rum-based craft cocktail bars, to craft brew beer gardens and speakeasies, we are able to offer comparable entertainment options to what one has downtown,” said Harlem Park to Park Executive Director, Nikoa Evans-Hendricks.

“We also have an opportunity to highlight the amazing beverage talent that these establishments are attracting throughout the uptown community,” added Karl Franz Williams, founder and CEO of Good Ice Marketing and owner of mixology bar 67 Orange Street. “Harlem and Washington Heights are not only attracting top restaurants, but both neighborhoods are also attracting and grooming amazing beverage talent. This competition will help generate some visibility for this talented group while providing some exciting entertainment for the neighborhood.”

Tickets to the Showdown finale on May 19, at Harlem Tavern cost $35 in advance and $40 at the door and can be purchased at www.uptownbattleofbars.eventbrite.com. Admission includes discounted drink/appetizer specials and original cocktail samples. Harlem Tavern is located at 2153 Frederick Douglas Boulevard and 116th Street.

Event Rundown:

May 5 to 15: Bars from across Harlem and Washington Heights create signature cocktails available to the public for $8. The public can vote for favorite cocktail at Instagram @UptownBattle.

May 19: Top bartenders compete at Harlem Tavern for title of “Best Uptown Bartender.”

Participating Bars
5 and Diamond, 67 Orange Street, 9A Kitchen & Lounge, Billie’s Black, Cantina 1838, Cedric’s, Chocolat Restaurant & Lounge, Corner Social, Cove Lounge, Harlem Food Bar, Harlem Public, Harlem Tavern, Heights Tavern, La Bodega 47 Social Club, La Marina, Lido Harlem, Maison Harlem, Minton’s, Moca Lounge, Red Rooster Harlem, Settepani, Shrine World Music Venue, Silvana, Sylvia’s Restaurant, The Cecil, The Park 112 Restaurant & Lounge, Vinateria Restaurant & Bar, Ya Tenga

August 25th, 2013 by harlemhouse

bars25u-1-web

The finalists are in and it’s going down!  Monday, August 26th at Harlem Tavern hosted by Bevy Smith with music by DJ Stormin’ Norman.  Uptown Battle of Bars VIP Showdown will start at 6 pm to 10 pm at Harlem Tavern.  Harlem Tavern is located in the heart of Harlem’s Restaurant Row at 2153 Frederick Douglass Boulevard and 116th Street.  Tickets are $35 in advance, $40 at the door.  Visit uptownbattleofbars.eventbrite.com to buy tickets.  

See yesterdays article in The Daily News 12 barkeeps vying for supremacy in Uptown Battle of the Bars…and all have a shot!  Pictures in this post are originally from the Daily News.

See our previous post  Uptown Battle Of The Bars Competition.

bars25u

August 6th, 2013 by HarlemGuy

photo

Top bars and bartenders uptown compete from August 12th – 21th.

Presented by HARLEM PARK TO PARK and sponsored by RIAZUL TEQUILA.

Final showdown event on August 26th from 6 pm – 10 pm, when the winner will be announced. DJ Stormin’ Norman of SUNDAE SERMON will provide the music, and the one and only Bevy Smith will be the celebrity judge.

THE RUNDOWN:

1. 35+ bars from West Harlem, East Harlem, Central Harlem and Washington Heights/Inwood each feature an original cocktail August 12th through August 21st.

2. Visit participating bars to sample original cocktails. Discounted price of $8 for cocktail on Monday, August 12th and Monday, August 19th.

3. Vote online at Instagram @UptownBattle until August 21st for your favorite bar to advance to the Showdown Finale event.

4. Bartenders from the top 3 bars with highest votes from each neighborhood will advance to the Finale/Showdown event on August 26th to compete for title of BEST UPTOWN BARTENDER.

5. Purchase tickets for admission to VIP Showdown event featuring industry/celebrity judges and celebrity dj, discounted drink/appetizer specials and original cocktail samples.

Tickets: $35 in advance
$40 at the door

Visit uptownbattleofbars.eventbrite.com to buy your tickets today!

PARTICIPATING BARS:

WEST HARLEM

9A NYC Kitchen & Lounge
Covo Trattoria
Harlem Public
The Grange Bar & Eatery

CENTRAL HARLEM

67 Orange Street
Bleu Violin
Chocolat Restaurant Lounge
Corner Social
Cove Lounge
Harlem Food Bar
Harlem Tavern
Lido Harlem
Melba’s Restaurant
Moca Lounge
Red Rooster Harlem
Ristorante Settepani
Shrine
Silvana
Sylvia’s Restaurant
WXYZ Bar/Aloft Harlem Hotel
Ya Tenga French Bistro

EAST HARLEM

Camaradas El Barrio
Harley’s Smokeshack
Prime One 16

WASHINGTON HEIGHTS/INWOOD

Coogan’s
Dyckman Bar
La Marina
Mamajuana Café
Mama Sushi
No Parking
Papasito Mexican Grill & Agave Bar
Uptown Social

photo

February 25th, 2017 by harlemcondolife

The Winter edition on Harlem Park To Park’s Harlem Restaurant & Retail Week 2017 has begun, so come out and enjoy some great deals at restaurants and retail in Harlem from FEBRUARY 15TH – FEBRUARY 28TH #EATSHOPPLAY See the full list of offers and deals from participating Harlem restaurants and retail. Share this:

 

Related Posted in: Bars & Restaurants, Harlem News   Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

November 3rd, 2016 by harlemcondolife

A phony real-estate broker was shamed Wednesday by a Harlem imam for stealing $50,000 that it took his congregants the past 30 years to raise, as the conman was sentenced to 3-to-6 years behind bars. Imam Al-Hajj Talib ‘Abdur-Rashid, from the Mosque of Islamic Brotherhood on W. 113th St., recalled how scammer Dan Stern “exploited…

July 1st, 2016 by INtoHarlem

Shop Harlem

It’s Summertime in Harlem and there’s
fun for the whole family!

From July 4th Parades, Fire Truck Sprinklers and Summer Camps for the Kids
to
New Summer Menus, Craft Cocktail Events, Day Parties and Live Jam Sessions for the Grown Folks!

There’s no better place to be this Summer than
Harlem….
NYC’s favorite neighborhood!

#WelcomeToMyHarlem
#ThisIsMyHarlem

See you in the neighborhood!

Battle Bars

Uptown Battle of the Bars 2016:  The Art of the Mix

VOTING HAS STARTED!
Sponsored by Hendrick’s Gin, Belvedere Vodka and Little Bamboo – Harlem

Bartenders representing thirty (30) of Uptown’s best bars create original cocktails to compete for the title of Best Uptown Bartender!
Help your favorite bartender advance to the Showdown Finale by sampling cocktails and voting for your top pick on Instagram @UptownBattle runs through Sunday, July 10th!

Showdown Finale with DJ Battle
on Monday, July 18th at MIST Harlem. 

Harlem  July 4th
Children’s Parade

Celebrate July 4th in Harlem!
Kids Yoga
Fire Truck Rides
Fire Truck Water Spray
Prizes for Best Decorated Bikes/Scooters
Lemonade & Snacks
July 4th Kids Parade

 (Don’t forget swimsuit & water shoes!)

Morningside Drive at 115th Street
Upper level of Morningside Park

Hosted by Vince Morgan and Shola Lynch

Sponsored by
H4Kids
Harlem Now
Harlem Park to Park
Land Yoga Wellness Center

Pono
Children’s Summer Camp

July 11th – September 8th
Ages 6 yrs to 10 yrs
www.pono.nyc

 

November 13th, 2015 by INtoHarlem
If you haven’t yet experienced babbalucci’s new fall menu, I highly suggest you run there immediately and get in on their delicious Italian dishes.  Great vibe, lovely cocktails, and a fantastic happy hour!
Aperitivo at babbalucci – Happy Hour Italian Style
Weekdays 6:00 – 8:00pm
Free appetizers with purchase of cocktail, wine, or beer.
babbalucci Italian Kitchen & Wood Burning Oven
New Fall Menus, Aperitivo & Bottomless Brunch
 
babbalucci’s Fall dinner menu created by Chef Andrew LoPresto offers new signature antipasti, insalate,
pastas, entrees and pizza.
Antipasti:
Steamed Mussels
(pancetta, garlic, cherry tomatoes, scallions, celery)
Pan Fried Brussel Sprouts with Pancetta
 

Steamed Mussels
Insalate:
Endive
(butternut squash, apple, ricotta salata, cider & honey vinaigrette)
Pastas:
Mezzi Rigatoni
(pancetta, cauliflower, butternut squash, mascarpone)
Squid Ink Tagliolini
(prawns, clams, mussels, calamari, tomato sauce)
Entrees:
Pan Fried Porgy
(roasted endive, cous cous)
Lamb Osso Buco
(braised lamb shank, baby carrots, mashed potatoes)
Pan Fried Porgy
 
Signature Pizza:
Atlantic
(tomato sauce, garlic, oregano, shrimp, clams, mussels, calamari)
DOP
(tomato sauce, burrata, parmesan, speck, balsamic reduction)
Carmela
(smoked mozzarella, sausage, broccoli rabe)
Americana
(tomato sauce, mozzarella, Parmigiana, oregano, red pepper flakes, garlic)
Breads baked in house, including the rolls
for their signature lunch sandwiches:
Sicilian Tuna & Goat Cheese
Italian Classic
(salami, ham, prosciutto, provolone, tomato, banana peppers, oil, vinegar)
Prosciutto
(mozzarella, tomato, arugula, olive oil)
Boozy Weekend Brunch
11:00am – 4:00pm
With purchase from the a la carte menu:
– receive one complimentary mimosa, sangria or bellini
– Bottles & Brunch: specials on Prosecco served with
a variety of cordials & fresh fruit purees
– Make it a Bottomless Brunch (15. pp ++)
 unlimited sangria or mimosas until 4pm
 

Grilled Brunch Seafood Platter

shrimp, calamari, salmon, clams, salsa verde
Sweet & Salty Brunch Pizza
speck, pear, gorgonzola, parmesan, drizzled balsamic
 
Aperitivo at babbalucci – Happy Hour Italian Style
Weekdays 6:00 – 8:00pm
Free appetizers with purchase of cocktail, wine, or beer.
Much like happy hour in America, aperitivo is a social cocktail gathering everyday between work and dinner. Instead of discounting drinks, Italian bars raise their prices and offer “buffet” style appetizers.
House crafted cocktails have been created by
award-winning mixologist & Campari Ambassador
Enzo Cangemi and Earlecia Richelle Gibb.
Lenox Up
 
Signatures include:
Cubana Mami
(Bulldog Gin, Cynar, lemon juice, homemade Mami marmalade, chocolate bitters)
Spiced Apple Sour
(Crown Royal Apple Whiskey, housemade ginger cordial,
lemon juice, egg white, cinnamon)
Lenox Up
(Grappa Nardini, Peach Combier, lemon juice,
homemage ginger marmalade, rosemary, splash of beer)
Country Tea #1
(Mizu Shochu, Vov, espresso coffee, chamomile syrup)
Spiced Apple Sour
Complete menus here.
331 Lenox Avenue
(b/w 126 & 127 Streets)
 
Lunch, Mon-Fri 11:00am-4:00pm
Dinner, Sun-Wed 4:00pm-11:00pm/Thurs-Sat til 12:00am
Aperitivo, Mon-Fri 6:00pm-8:00pm
Weekend Brunch, 11:00am-4:00pm
Like us on FacebookFollow us on TwitterView on Instagram
GSPRPHONELOGO.jpg
Gail Schoenberg Public Relations
Like us on FacebookFollow us on TwitterView on Instagram
March 7th, 2015 by HarlemGuy

We have often written about our love of Harlem and what it represents – past, present and future.

We believe that President’s Obama’s March 7th speech  commemorating “Bloody Sunday” provides an amazing opportunity to learn, appreciate and share all of what Harlem has, does and will represent.

We urge everyone to take this opportunity to share and discuss.

images-1

It is a rare honor in this life to follow one of your heroes. And John Lewis is one of my heroes.

Now, I have to imagine that when a younger John Lewis woke up that morning fifty years ago and made his way to Brown Chapel, heroics were not on his mind. A day like this was not on his mind. Young folks with bedrolls and backpacks were milling about. Veterans of the movement trained newcomers in the tactics of non-violence; the right way to protect yourself when attacked. A doctor described what tear gas does to the body, while marchers scribbled down instructions for contacting their loved ones. The air was thick with doubt, anticipation, and fear. They comforted themselves with the final verse of the final hymn they sung:

No matter what may be the test, God will take care of you;

Lean, weary one, upon His breast, God will take care of you.

Then, his knapsack stocked with an apple, a toothbrush, a book on government – all you need for a night behind bars – John Lewis led them out of the church on a mission to change America.

President Bush and Mrs. Bush, Governor Bentley, Members of Congress, Mayor Evans, Reverend Strong, friends and fellow Americans:

There are places, and moments in America where this nation’s destiny has been decided. Many are sites of war – Concord and Lexington, Appomattox and Gettysburg. Others are sites that symbolize the daring of America’s character – Independence Hall and Seneca Falls, Kitty Hawk and Cape Canaveral.

Selma is such a place.

In one afternoon fifty years ago, so much of our turbulent history – the stain of slavery and anguish of civil war; the yoke of segregation and tyranny of Jim Crow; the death of four little girls in Birmingham, and the dream of a Baptist preacher – met on this bridge.

It was not a clash of armies, but a clash of wills; a contest to determine the meaning of America.

And because of men and women like John Lewis, Joseph Lowery, Hosea Williams, Amelia Boynton, Diane Nash, Ralph Abernathy, C.T. Vivian, Andrew Young, Fred Shuttlesworth, Dr. King, and so many more, the idea of a just America, a fair America, an inclusive America, a generous America – that idea ultimately triumphed.

As is true across the landscape of American history, we cannot examine this moment in isolation. The march on Selma was part of a broader campaign that spanned generations; the leaders that day part of a long line of heroes.

We gather here to celebrate them. We gather here to honor the courage of ordinary Americans willing to endure billy clubs and the chastening rod; tear gas and the trampling hoof; men and women who despite the gush of blood and splintered bone would stay true to their North Star and keep marching toward justice.

They did as Scripture instructed: “Rejoice in hope, be patient in tribulation, be constant in prayer.” And in the days to come, they went back again and again. When the trumpet call sounded for more to join, the people came – black and white, young and old, Christian and Jew, waving the American flag and singing the same anthems full of faith and hope. A white newsman, Bill Plante, who covered the marches then and who is with us here today, quipped that the growing number of white people lowered the quality of the singing. To those who marched, though, those old gospel songs must have never sounded so sweet.

In time, their chorus would reach President Johnson. And he would send them protection, echoing their call for the nation and the world to hear:

“We shall overcome.”

What enormous faith these men and women had. Faith in God – but also faith in America.

The Americans who crossed this bridge were not physically imposing. But they gave courage to millions. They held no elected office. But they led a nation. They marched as Americans who had endured hundreds of years of brutal violence, and countless daily indignities – but they didn’t seek special treatment, just the equal treatment promised to them almost a century before.

What they did here will reverberate through the ages. Not because the change they won was preordained; not because their victory was complete; but because they proved that nonviolent change is possible; that love and hope can conquer hate.

As we commemorate their achievement, we are well-served to remember that at the time of the marches, many in power condemned rather than praised them. Back then, they were called Communists, half-breeds, outside agitators, sexual and moral degenerates, and worse – everything but the name their parents gave them. Their faith was questioned. Their lives were threatened. Their patriotism was challenged.

And yet, what could be more American than what happened in this place?

What could more profoundly vindicate the idea of America than plain and humble people – the unsung, the downtrodden, the dreamers not of high station, not born to wealth or privilege, not of one religious tradition but many – coming together to shape their country’s course?

What greater expression of faith in the American experiment than this; what greater form of patriotism is there; than the belief that America is not yet finished, that we are strong enough to be self-critical, that each successive generation can look upon our imperfections and decide that it is in our power to remake this nation to more closely align with our highest ideals?

That’s why Selma is not some outlier in the American experience. That’s why it’s not a museum or static monument to behold from a distance. It is instead the manifestation of a creed written into our founding documents:

“We the People…in order to form a more perfect union.”

“We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.”

These are not just words. They are a living thing, a call to action, a roadmap for citizenship and an insistence in the capacity of free men and women to shape our own destiny. For founders like Franklin and Jefferson, for leaders like Lincoln and FDR, the success of our experiment in self-government rested on engaging all our citizens in this work. That’s what we celebrate here in Selma. That’s what this movement was all about, one leg in our long journey toward freedom.

The American instinct that led these young men and women to pick up the torch and cross this bridge is the same instinct that moved patriots to choose revolution over tyranny. It’s the same instinct that drew immigrants from across oceans and the Rio Grande; the same instinct that led women to reach for the ballot and workers to organize against an unjust status quo; the same instinct that led us to plant a flag at Iwo Jima and on the surface of the Moon.

It’s the idea held by generations of citizens who believed that America is a constant work in progress; who believed that loving this country requires more than singing its praises or avoiding uncomfortable truths. It requires the occasional disruption, the willingness to speak out for what’s right and shake up the status quo.

That’s what makes us unique, and cements our reputation as a beacon of opportunity. Young people behind the Iron Curtain would see Selma and eventually tear down a wall. Young people in Soweto would hear Bobby Kennedy talk about ripples of hope and eventually banish the scourge of apartheid. Young people in Burma went to prison rather than submit to military rule. From the streets of Tunis to the Maidan in Ukraine, this generation of young people can draw strength from this place, where the powerless could change the world’s greatest superpower, and push their leaders to expand the boundaries of freedom.

They saw that idea made real in Selma, Alabama. They saw it made real in America.

Because of campaigns like this, a Voting Rights Act was passed. Political, economic, and social barriers came down, and the change these men and women wrought is visible here today in the presence of African-Americans who run boardrooms, who sit on the bench, who serve in elected office from small towns to big cities; from the Congressional Black Caucus to the Oval Office.

Because of what they did, the doors of opportunity swung open not just for African-Americans, but for every American. Women marched through those doors. Latinos marched through those doors. Asian-Americans, gay Americans, and Americans with disabilities came through those doors. Their endeavors gave the entire South the chance to rise again, not by reasserting the past, but by transcending the past.

What a glorious thing, Dr. King might say.

What a solemn debt we owe.

Which leads us to ask, just how might we repay that debt?

First and foremost, we have to recognize that one day’s commemoration, no matter how special, is not enough. If Selma taught us anything, it’s that our work is never done – the American experiment in self-government gives work and purpose to each generation.

Selma teaches us, too, that action requires that we shed our cynicism. For when it comes to the pursuit of justice, we can afford neither complacency nor despair.

Just this week, I was asked whether I thought the Department of Justice’s Ferguson report shows that, with respect to race, little has changed in this country. I understand the question, for the report’s narrative was woefully familiar. It evoked the kind of abuse and disregard for citizens that spawned the Civil Rights Movement. But I rejected the notion that nothing’s changed. What happened in Ferguson may not be unique, but it’s no longer endemic, or sanctioned by law and custom; and before the Civil Rights Movement, it most surely was.

We do a disservice to the cause of justice by intimating that bias and discrimination are immutable, or that racial division is inherent to America. If you think nothing’s changed in the past fifty years, ask somebody who lived through the Selma or Chicago or L.A. of the Fifties. Ask the female CEO who once might have been assigned to the secretarial pool if nothing’s changed. Ask your gay friend if it’s easier to be out and proud in America now than it was thirty years ago. To deny this progress – our progress – would be to rob us of our own agency; our responsibility to do what we can to make America better.

Of course, a more common mistake is to suggest that racism is banished, that the work that drew men and women to Selma is complete, and that whatever racial tensions remain are a consequence of those seeking to play the “race card” for their own purposes. We don’t need the Ferguson report to know that’s not true. We just need to open our eyes, and ears, and hearts, to know that this nation’s racial history still casts its long shadow upon us. We know the march is not yet over, the race is not yet won, and that reaching that blessed destination where we are judged by the content of our character – requires admitting as much.

“We are capable of bearing a great burden,” James Baldwin wrote, “once we discover that the burden is reality and arrive where reality is.”

This is work for all Americans, and not just some. Not just whites. Not just blacks. If we want to honor the courage of those who marched that day, then all of us are called to possess their moral imagination. All of us will need to feel, as they did, the fierce urgency of now. All of us need to recognize, as they did, that change depends on our actions, our attitudes, the things we teach our children. And if we make such effort, no matter how hard it may seem, laws can be passed, and consciences can be stirred, and consensus can be built.

With such effort, we can make sure our criminal justice system serves all and not just some. Together, we can raise the level of mutual trust that policing is built on – the idea that police officers are members of the communities they risk their lives to protect, and citizens in Ferguson and New York and Cleveland just want the same thing young people here marched for – the protection of the law. Together, we can address unfair sentencing, and overcrowded prisons, and the stunted circumstances that rob too many boys of the chance to become men, and rob the nation of too many men who could be good dads, and workers, and neighbors.

With effort, we can roll back poverty and the roadblocks to opportunity. Americans don’t accept a free ride for anyone, nor do we believe in equality of outcomes. But we do expect equal opportunity, and if we really mean it, if we’re willing to sacrifice for it, then we can make sure every child gets an education suitable to this new century, one that expands imaginations and lifts their sights and gives them skills. We can make sure every person willing to work has the dignity of a job, and a fair wage, and a real voice, and sturdier rungs on that ladder into the middle class.

And with effort, we can protect the foundation stone of our democracy for which so many marched across this bridge – and that is the right to vote. Right now, in 2015, fifty years after Selma, there are laws across this country designed to make it harder for people to vote. As we speak, more of such laws are being proposed. Meanwhile, the Voting Rights Act, the culmination of so much blood and sweat and tears, the product of so much sacrifice in the face of wanton violence, stands weakened, its future subject to partisan rancor.

How can that be? The Voting Rights Act was one of the crowning achievements of our democracy, the result of Republican and Democratic effort. President Reagan signed its renewal when he was in office. President Bush signed its renewal when he was in office. One hundred Members of Congress have come here today to honor people who were willing to die for the right it protects. If we want to honor this day, let these hundred go back to Washington, and gather four hundred more, and together, pledge to make it their mission to restore the law this year.

Of course, our democracy is not the task of Congress alone, or the courts alone, or the President alone. If every new voter suppression law was struck down today, we’d still have one of the lowest voting rates among free peoples. Fifty years ago, registering to vote here in Selma and much of the South meant guessing the number of jellybeans in a jar or bubbles on a bar of soap. It meant risking your dignity, and sometimes, your life. What is our excuse today for not voting? How do we so casually discard the right for which so many fought? How do we so fully give away our power, our voice, in shaping America’s future?

Fellow marchers, so much has changed in fifty years. We’ve endured war, and fashioned peace. We’ve seen technological wonders that touch every aspect of our lives, and take for granted convenience our parents might scarcely imagine. But what has not changed is the imperative of citizenship, that willingness of a 26 year-old deacon, or a Unitarian minister, or a young mother of five, to decide they loved this country so much that they’d risk everything to realize its promise.

That’s what it means to love America. That’s what it means to believe in America. That’s what it means when we say America is exceptional.

For we were born of change. We broke the old aristocracies, declaring ourselves entitled not by bloodline, but endowed by our Creator with certain unalienable rights. We secure our rights and responsibilities through a system of self-government, of and by and for the people. That’s why we argue and fight with so much passion and conviction, because we know our efforts matter. We know America is what we make of it.

We are Lewis and Clark and Sacajawea – pioneers who braved the unfamiliar, followed by a stampede of farmers and miners, entrepreneurs and hucksters. That’s our spirit.

We are Sojourner Truth and Fannie Lou Hamer, women who could do as much as any man and then some; and we’re Susan B. Anthony, who shook the system until the law reflected that truth. That’s our character.

We’re the immigrants who stowed away on ships to reach these shores, the huddled masses yearning to breathe free – Holocaust survivors, Soviet defectors, the Lost Boys of Sudan. We are the hopeful strivers who cross the Rio Grande because they want their kids to know a better life. That’s how we came to be.

We’re the slaves who built the White House and the economy of the South. We’re the ranch hands and cowboys who opened the West, and countless laborers who laid rail, and raised skyscrapers, and organized for workers’ rights.

We’re the fresh-faced GIs who fought to liberate a continent, and we’re the Tuskeegee Airmen, Navajo code-talkers, and Japanese-Americans who fought for this country even as their own liberty had been denied. We’re the firefighters who rushed into those buildings on 9/11, and the volunteers who signed up to fight in Afghanistan and Iraq.

We are the gay Americans whose blood ran on the streets of San Francisco and New York, just as blood ran down this bridge.

We are storytellers, writers, poets, and artists who abhor unfairness, and despise hypocrisy, and give voice to the voiceless, and tell truths that need to be told.

We are the inventors of gospel and jazz and the blues, bluegrass and country, hip-hop and rock and roll, our very own sounds with all the sweet sorrow and reckless joy of freedom.

We are Jackie Robinson, enduring scorn and spiked cleats and pitches coming straight to his head, and stealing home in the World Series anyway.

We are the people Langston Hughes wrote of, who “build our temples for tomorrow, strong as we know how.”

We are the people Emerson wrote of, “who for truth and honor’s sake stand fast and suffer long;” who are “never tired, so long as we can see far enough.”

That’s what America is. Not stock photos or airbrushed history or feeble attempts to define some of us as more American as others. We respect the past, but we don’t pine for it. We don’t fear the future; we grab for it. America is not some fragile thing; we are large, in the words of Whitman, containing multitudes. We are boisterous and diverse and full of energy, perpetually young in spirit. That’s why someone like John Lewis at the ripe age of 25 could lead a mighty march.

And that’s what the young people here today and listening all across the country must take away from this day. You are America. Unconstrained by habits and convention. Unencumbered by what is, and ready to seize what ought to be. For everywhere in this country, there are first steps to be taken, and new ground to cover, and bridges to be crossed. And it is you, the young and fearless at heart, the most diverse and educated generation in our history, who the nation is waiting to follow.

Because Selma shows us that America is not the project of any one person.

Because the single most powerful word in our democracy is the word “We.” We The People. We Shall Overcome. Yes We Can. It is owned by no one. It belongs to everyone. Oh, what a glorious task we are given, to continually try to improve this great nation of ours.

Fifty years from Bloody Sunday, our march is not yet finished. But we are getting closer. Two hundred and thirty-nine years after this nation’s founding, our union is not yet perfect. But we are getting closer. Our job’s easier because somebody already got us through that first mile. Somebody already got us over that bridge. When it feels the road’s too hard, when the torch we’ve been passed feels too heavy, we will remember these early travelers, and draw strength from their example, and hold firmly the words of the prophet Isaiah:

“Those who hope in the Lord will renew their strength. They will soar on wings like eagles. They will run and not grow weary. They will walk and not be faint.”

We honor those who walked so we could run. We must run so our children soar. And we will not grow weary. For we believe in the power of an awesome God, and we believe in this country’s sacred promise.

May He bless those warriors of justice no longer with us, and bless the United States of America.

June 27th, 2014 by HarlemGuy

before you know it

Tonight at 7:00pm!

A Gay Pride Month Special

Hosted by Harlem Sage and Harlem Pride

Not to be missed!

Before You Know It

PJ Raval, 2013, 110 min.

The subjects of Before You Know It are no ordinary senior citizens. They are go-go booted bar-hoppers, love struck activists, troublemaking baton twirlers, late night Internet cruisers, seasoned renegades and bold adventurers. They are also among the estimated 2.4 million lesbian, gay and bisexual Americans over the age of 55 in the United States, many of whom face heightened levels of discrimination, neglect and exclusion. But Before is not a film about cold statistics and gloomy realities, it’s a film about generational trailblazers who have surmounted prejudice and defied expectation to form communities of strength, renewal and camaraderie-whether these communities be affable senior living facilities, lively activist enclaves or wacky queer bars brimming with glittered trinkets and colorful drag queens.

Dennis is a gentle-hearted widower in his 70s who begins exploring his sexual identity and fondness for dressing in women’s clothing under the name “Dee.” Ty is an impassioned LGBT activist who hears nothing but wedding bells once gay marriage passes in New York. Robert “The Mouth” is a feisty bar owner who presses on when his neighborhood institution comes under threat. Born before the Civil Rights era, these men have witnessed unbelievable change in their lifetimes, from the Stonewall Riots and gay liberation, to the HIV/AIDS pandemic and Queer Nation, to gay marriage and Lady Gaga, and have lived to become part of an unprecedented “out” elder generation. Before focuses on the lives of these three gay seniors, but reminds us that while LGBT elders face a specific set of issues, aging and its challenges are universal. An affirmation of life and human resilience told with a refreshing humor and candor, Before confirms that you are never too old to reshape society.

Q&A with director PJ Raval and subject Ty Martin.

Read an interview with Ty about tonight’s event from www.Harlemfocus.com.

December 30th, 2013 by harlemhouse

newyearseve2013_fullsize_story1

If you want to avoid all the overcrowded downtown clubs with tourists and long lines, celebrate New Years Eve in Harlem!  It is not too late for many of the best venus uptown to make reservations for tomorrow night.  Here is a list of flyers for some great Harlem Hot Spot to consider.  No reason to venture below 110th Street… bring in your 2014 New Years party uptown!  Everything you need is right here with a large variety of great restaurants, bars and clubs.

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!

newyears-park-112

Screen Shot 2013-12-30 at 12.51.17 PM

new-year-Maison-Harlem

newyears-the-cecil

mintons-harlem-holidays

newyears-cove-lounge

newyear-corner-social

new-years-silvana

New-Years-Eve-at-Ginnys

new-years-ChocolateScreen Shot 2013-12-30 at 12.53.38 PM

new-year-Savann

Screen Shot 2013-12-30 at 12.55.20 PM

newyear-the-grange

new-year-harlem-public

 

Many many more great Harlem spots for NYE… HARLEM FOOD BAR, THE 5 AND DIAMOND, L LOUNGE, CEDRIC FRENCH BISTRO, BILLIES BLACK, JADO SUSHI, HARLEM TAVERN, HARLEM SHAKE , BIER INTERNATIONAL , RICARDOS, VINATERIA just to name a few.  Drink responsibly, support your local businesses and HAVE A BLAST!

*See Harlem Condo Life’s “Restaurant Reviews” for HarlemRestarunatRow