Category: Books

September 14th, 2015 by HarlemGuy

Damon Tweedy’s memoir is at once a painful self-examination and a look at the health implications of being black in a country where blacks are more likely to suffer from certain ailments.

Source: Review: In ‘Black Man in a White Coat,’ a Doctor Navigates Bruising Terrain – The New York Times

Posted in Books

August 15th, 2014 by HarlemGuy

Seeing through Race: A Reinterpretation of Civil Rights Photography



“This work speaks to the power images have in framing how we see and react to others.  Critically important in the current era of images,  and given the persistent frisking, shooting, incarcerations and killing of innocent people of color in communities including – and not limited to, our beloved Harlem.”
— HarlemCondoLife

New From: $24.65 USD In Stock

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July 21st, 2014 by harlemhouse

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“If you only read the books that everyone else is reading, you can only think what everyone else is thinking.”

– Haruki Murakami

Posted in Art and Culture, Books, Education, Poetry, Quote Tagged with: , , , , , ,

May 28th, 2014 by harlemhouse

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Maya Angelou died at her home in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, on Wednesday, said her literary agent, Helen Brann.

The 86-year-old was a novelist, actress, professor, singer, dancer and activist.  In 2010, President Barack Obama named her the recipient of the Medal of Freedom, the country’s highest civilian honor.

One of Angelou’s most praised books was “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings.”
(read more) Legendary author Maya Angelou dies at age 86

*Fellow Harlemite and friend Norman, writes on his Facebook “There are people that you think will live forever and #mayaangelou is one of them.”

*Another Anne B. writes “I loved her books so much.  I remember first reading them in the 1970s.  She was a favorite of mine and she meant so much to me.”

Posted in Art and Culture, Books, Breaking News, Celebrity, Central Harlem, Community, Culture, East Harlem, Education, Harlem, HarlemCondoLife, History, North Harlem, South Harlem (SOHA), West Harlem Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

April 19th, 2014 by HarlemGuy

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The latest addition to the HarlemCondoLife store was recently featured in the New York Times.

“All God’s Dangers” is an all but forgotten but critically important sharecropper’s story that won a National Book Award in 1975.

It is an oral history of an illiterate black Alabama sharecropper. Its author, the man who compiled it from extensive interviews, was writer Theodore Rosengarten.

“There are only a few American autobiographies of surpassing greatness….Now there is another one, Nate Shaw’s.” — The New York Times

“Extraordinarily rich and compelling…possesses the same luminous power we associate with Faulkner…the same marvelous idiom, the same wry, sardonic humor…[it] will stun the listener-reader, hold him in its grip, and never really quite let go of him? — Washington Post

“Eloquent and revelatory. When, finally, this big book is put down, one feels exhilarated. This is an anthem to human endurance.” — Studs Terkel, New Republic –This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

All God’s Dangers: The Life of Nate Shaw


New From: $13.00 USD In Stock

Posted in Books, HarlemCondoLife, History Tagged with: , , , , ,

February 15th, 2014 by HarlemGuy

black stats via harlemcondolife

I recently had an opportunity to listen to and then meet Monique W. Morris and Khalil Gibran Muhammad discussing Monique’s new book: Black Stats.

This book is a vast compendium of revealing facts about blacks in the 20th Century.  It is the first ever work of it’s kind.

When asked what was the most surprising fact she came across,  Ms. Morris mentioned a timely stat regarding views on gay marriage.  She also shared a stat regarding incarceration rates that people might find surprising.   Mr. Muhammad provided a fascinating perspective on how facts can be used to illuminate or  perpetuate bias.

Monique W. Morris is co-founder of the National Black Women’s Justice Institute. She is a Soros Justice Fellow and formerly served as Vice President for Economic Programs, Advocacy, and Research for the NAACP. A faculty member at St. Mary’s College of California, she is the author of the novel Too Beautiful for Words.

Khalil Gibran Muhammad is the director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture at the New York Public Library and the author of The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America.

This and other books, music, etc can be found on HarlemCondoLife’s recently upgrade store, located here.

Posted in Books, History Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

December 11th, 2013 by harlemhouse

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The Maysles Documentary Center in association with Zero Point Zero Production and The New York Society for Ethical Culture is proud to present a conversation about film and food with Anthony Bourdain and Albert Maysles, moderated by Michaela Angela Davis and featuring special guest Marcus Samuelsson. We will feature clips from legendary documentary filmmaker Albert Maysles’ genre defining work in film, and Emmy award winning chef, author and travel journalist Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown television series. Join us as the two speak about the art of auteur filmmaking, serendipitous dining, and how cameras connect diverse peoples around the globe. All proceeds to benefit the Maysles Documentary Center.

A Note on Tickets:
Tickets are available for the event only at $65.00 by selecting 7:30pm Wed, Dec. 11th below.

Tickets are available for the pre-reception and the event for $125.00 by selecting 6:00pm, on Wed. Dec. 11th below.

Tickets available HERE.

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Posted in Art and Culture, Books, business, Celebrity, Cooking, Education, Event, Food, HarlemCondoLife, Sundae Sermon Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

November 18th, 2013 by HarlemGuy

food is what i do via harlemcondolife

Joseph “JJ” Johnson, chef de cuisine of Harlem’s new hot spot The Cecil, along with Christopher Stewart, chef and food blogger release their highly anticipated cookbook, “Food is What I Do”.

“Food is What I Do” highlights recipes and dishes from a chefs approach that the reader can relate to. Using local ingredients and modern cooking techniques, Chef JJ has put together a collection of delicious recipes to share with family and friends, while also bringing a little piece of chef jj into your kitchen.

We really loved our meals at the Cecil and are so happy for what we expect will quickly become a standard work of culinary art.

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BIOS courtesy of the authors:

Chef JJ:

A graduate of the Culinary Institute of America he was inspired to pursue his love for food by the cuisine of his Caribbean grandmother.

Chef JJ’s talents were further honed in the kitchens of New York’s most highly esteemed restaurants such as ‘Centro Vinoteca’, ‘Jane’ and ‘Tribeca Grill’. He has spent time in Ghana studying West African cuisine and showcased his skills at ‘Villa Monticello’, Ghana’s Premier Luxury Boutique Hotel and Spa. This culinary experience and life changing trip to Ghana prepared Chef JJ for The Cecil, a afro/asian/american brasserie showcasing African dispora.

Christopher Stewart:

Christopher Stewart, chef, food blogger, and blossoming food writer, knew food was instilled in her from the very beginning. A graduate of The Culinary Institute of America, where she met and became friends with Chef JJ, Christopher lives and works in New York City. With several restaurant jobs under her belt including becoming Executive Chef at 24, she has now set out on the writing adventure of her life, co-authoring Food Is What I Do with Chef JJ. The popularity of her food blog, “EatingFabulously” keeps food close to her heart and also provided her with unique opportunities to showcase her writing, including writing for MarcusSamuelsson.com, UPTOWNFlavor, and various other sites.”

Food Is What I Do


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November 3rd, 2013 by HarlemGuy

The African Americans via HarlemCondoLife

Herve’ Jean-Baptiste

I recently had a chance to meet with and hear Henry Louis Gates discuss his latest work, which I have been watching on TV.   The series is the most captivating I have ever seen on the subject.  There is an insight in every pause, word, sentence, still, etc.  Truly remarkable. “Must See TV”.

Upon introducing myself, the first thing he remarked is “you are of Haitian descent” which is half true, the other half being Canadian.  Both facts figure prominently in early episodes, and I found myself feeling extremely proud of my heritage.  I consider my heritage a gift.

During his keynote address to a room of about 100 of us, he mentioned his Harlem roots,  spoke about the need for everyone to understand America’s economic history and the key role the enslavement and torture of human beings played, and urged everyone to become more educated about the achievements and innovations of African Americans.

He also talked about the need for current and new black leaders to develop a comprehensive strategy for making sure that ground won is not lost (voting rights, affirmative action, etc) and for closing a widening economic gap that leaves millions of people no better today than they were 30 years ago (a sad fact that statistics support).  He also mentioned the importance of personal responsibility.   One aspect of which I call “doing it from within” – as in your self.  Your family.  Your community.  As the circle widens it causes change.  Like ripples across the many rivers we have – and will continue to, cross.  As so well told by Mr. Gates.

 

The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross


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October 13th, 2013 by harlemhouse

russell-simmons

“You know, I love all kinds of activism.  I certainly think blacks deserve to have something whether it is affirmative action or an opportunity that should be opened up to them.  But at the same time I believe that people of color are not the only poor people in America and all over the world.”

“Respect your parents.  What they tell you is true.  Hard work, dedication and faith will get you anything.  Imagination will drive itself.  You can get anything you want, but you have to have faith behind all your ideas.  Stick to your goals and have an undying faith.”

– Russell Simmons

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EDITORIAL:

We wanted to quote Russell Simmons this week again (one of many times that we have quoted Simmons here on our blog in our inspirational quotes archive) as a follow up to our quote from Don Lemon last week.  I believe both of these public figures are inspirational to our children and the community.

It’s ok to come from different view points and have a discussion or a debate. Especially when ultimately everyone wants the same thing, people growing into the best person that they can be.  Self-empowerment (as Don said) and recognizing your self worth.  The  important bottom line here is to have the discussion.  This discussion which has been brought up several times over the years by many public figures such as Bill Cosby and Oprah Winfrey, Jay Z and Common.  I remember on the Oprah show when Jay Z was on, and they politely disagreed with each other about his lyrics.  But you believed that they walked away with respect for each other even though they viewed the topic differently.  I love interviews like this because it brings up a discussion.  It is an important discussion to keep having.  Whether agreeing or disagreeing have a discussion with your kids and each other and keep it moving.

I really like the second quote above by Russell Simmons “Respect your parents…” The message really helps to mold your/our way of thinking.  And if not your parents, your grandmother, or your aunt or older brother, sister etc.  To discuss helping people, improving yourself, helping each other, treating one another with kindness and respect, I can’t think of a better or more important discussion to have.  Even if it starts with a disagreement it might end with an agreement or at least an understanding.

And just one last thing, living in New York is one thing, but living in Harlem is a bigger feeling of community, and focus and passion towards helping those that need it.  At least this is the Harlem that I have come to love.  People here in our community black, white, spanish, artist, corporate, community organizers, politicians, rich, poor, moms, students whatever, all seem to step it up a notch or two and this is a great thing.  I was speaking with someone the other night at a Harlem event (at the HarlemGarage) and we were discussing Detroit (the woman I was speaking with was from there) and the turmoil that Detroit is going through right now.  She said she wants to go help in some way.  We both shared an enthusiasm on how we might help – help is really where it all begins.  That’s what I’m talking about.  People that give a sh#! (pardon my French) and walk the walk don’t talk the talk.  I think Russell, Don, everyone that I’ve mentioned above  are perfect examples of people who care and act.  And if you disagree, just wikipedia any one of them.

Keep it moving, have faith, keep having the discussions.  We all want the same things, though we may get there in our own way, style and time.

Posted in Books, Celebrity, Central Harlem, Community, Culture, Don Lemon, East Harlem, Education, Faith/Religion, Health & Wellness, History, Kids, New York City, North Harlem, Quote, Russell Simmons, South Harlem (SOHA), West Harlem Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,