Category Archives: Art and Culture

Quote Of The Week: Ryunosuke Satoro

HarlemCondoLife

“Individually, We are one drop.
Together, we are an ocean.”

- Ryunosuke Satoro

*The works of Ryunosuke Satoro have been translated in countless world languages and continue to inspire people of all ages and cultures beyond borders.

Harlem Condo Life – Phoenix: Xu Bing at the Cathedral in Harlem

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I can’t wait to go to check out this new exhibit at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine which according to their website opened on March 1st. Read on…

Over the course of two years, pioneering Chinese contemporary artist Xu Bing culled detritus from construction sites across the rapidly changing urban landscape of Beijing, and transformed it into his most monumental project to date: Phoenix (2008-10). A feat of engineering and ingenuity, Phoenix is composed of two birds, a male called Feng and a female called Huang. Feng and Huang—each weighing 12 tons and measuring 90 and 100 feet long, respectively—are now coming to the Cathedral. They will hang suspended in the Nave, two majestic birds in perpetual flight beneath its celestial ceiling.

http://www.stjohndivine.org/programs/art/upcoming-exhibitions

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THE CATHEDRAL CHURCH OF
SAINT JOHN THE DIVINE

1047 Amsterdam Avenue at 112th Street
New York, NY 10025
(212) 316-7540

Sunday Jazz Corner with Jimmie Lunceford

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James Melvin “Jimmie” Lunceford (June 6, 1902 – July 12, 1947) was an American Jazz alto saxophonist and bandleader in the swing era.

Jimmie Lunceford is the odd man out in jazz history. This bandleader made no waves with his musicianship – his preferred instrument was the conductor’s baton – and he possessed neither the elegance of Ellington nor the hipster hauteur of Calloway. But Lunceford knew how to entertain an audience, and he led one of the finest jazz bands of the 1930s. When Lunceford’s ensemble took a booking at the Cotton Club, following in the footsteps of Cab and the Duke, dancers would hardly have missed a beat. “Harlem Shout” demonstrates the core virtues of this orchestra: its swinging riff-based charts, its hot and polished section work, and (another calling card of Lunceford’s bands) high-note trumpet theatrics, provided here by Paul Webster. Like a hearty band of soldiers, this ensemble always maintained discipline under fire, and there was inevitably plenty of hot stuff around when folks like Sy Oliver and Eddie Durham were handing out the parts. Perhaps if Lunceford had lived longer – he died, reportedly of a heart attack (although under suspicious circumstances), at age 45 – he might have been fêted as elder statesman of jazz. But, as it stands, he is little more than a half-remembered name for most younger jazz fans. Tis pity, ’cause this band was sublime.  Reviewer Credit: Ted Gioia

Read Wikipedia on Jimmie Lunceford stating rumors about his death (suspicious circumstances) that he was actually poisoned in Seaside, Oregon by a restaurant owner.

Tain’t What You Do – Jimmie Lunceford

Jimmie Lunceford and His Dance Orchestra 1936 (LIVE)

Harlem Shout – Jimmie Lunceford Orchestra

Diversity and the Oscars

oscar diversity infographic harlemcondolife.com

Lee & Low is a children’s book publisher focussed on bringing diverse voices to the forefront and promoting related conversations.

They produced this info graphic of the Academy’s track record on honoring the work of minorities.  The backdrop to this includes an investigation by The Los Angeles Times in 2012.  The Times found that the majority of Academy members are older white men, and of the 85 best actress awards, just one went to a person of color, Halle Berry in 2002.

The Academy’s new president is Cheryl Boone Isaacs, the first African-American to do so.   She and its chief executive Dawn Hudson are taking steps to increase diversity, which includes a diverse roster of faces for the March 2 show.

Click here for interviews with independent filmmakers of color about their roles in Hollywood.

via: http://carpetbagger.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/02/24/the-academy-and-diversity-by-the-numbers/