Tag Archives: Duke Ellington

Sunday Jazz Corner with Jimmie Lunceford

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James Melvin “Jimmie” Lunceford (June 6, 1902 – July 12, 1947) was an American Jazz alto saxophonist and bandleader in the swing era.

Jimmie Lunceford is the odd man out in jazz history. This bandleader made no waves with his musicianship – his preferred instrument was the conductor’s baton – and he possessed neither the elegance of Ellington nor the hipster hauteur of Calloway. But Lunceford knew how to entertain an audience, and he led one of the finest jazz bands of the 1930s. When Lunceford’s ensemble took a booking at the Cotton Club, following in the footsteps of Cab and the Duke, dancers would hardly have missed a beat. “Harlem Shout” demonstrates the core virtues of this orchestra: its swinging riff-based charts, its hot and polished section work, and (another calling card of Lunceford’s bands) high-note trumpet theatrics, provided here by Paul Webster. Like a hearty band of soldiers, this ensemble always maintained discipline under fire, and there was inevitably plenty of hot stuff around when folks like Sy Oliver and Eddie Durham were handing out the parts. Perhaps if Lunceford had lived longer – he died, reportedly of a heart attack (although under suspicious circumstances), at age 45 – he might have been fêted as elder statesman of jazz. But, as it stands, he is little more than a half-remembered name for most younger jazz fans. Tis pity, ’cause this band was sublime.  Reviewer Credit: Ted Gioia

Read Wikipedia on Jimmie Lunceford stating rumors about his death (suspicious circumstances) that he was actually poisoned in Seaside, Oregon by a restaurant owner.

Tain’t What You Do – Jimmie Lunceford

Jimmie Lunceford and His Dance Orchestra 1936 (LIVE)

Harlem Shout – Jimmie Lunceford Orchestra

Sunday Jazz Corner with Duke Ellington

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Duke Ellington’s last words were, “Music is how I live, why I live and how I will be remembered”.  He was an American composer, pianist, and jazz-orchestra leader with a career that spanned more than 50 years.  Ellington led his orchestra from 1923 until his death.  He was born  April 29, 1899 and passed along on May 24, 1974.  He was known as a key participant of  the Harlem Renaissance era and his legacy lives on in Harlem and all around the world.

For this post I chose two video performances “Take The A Train” live in Harlem 1964, and a video of Ellington and his band performing “It Don’t Mean A Thing” back in 1943.

Duke Ellington married his high school sweetheart, Edna Thompson, on July 2, 1918, when he was 19.  Shortly after their marriage, on March 11, 1919 Edna gave birth to their only son, Mercer Kennedy Ellington.  Ellington was joined in New York City by his wife and son in the late twenties, but the couple soon permanently separated.  According to her obituary in Jet magazine, she was “homesick for Washington” and returned (she died in 1967).  In 1938 he met and moved in with Cotton Club employee Beatrice “Evie” Ellis, who with with him during his Cotton Club years in Harlem.  The relationship with Ellis, though stormy, continued after Ellington met Fernandae de Castro Monte in the early 1960s. Ellington supported both women for the rest of his life.

At his funeral, attended by over 12,000 people at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in Harlem, Ella Fitzgerald summed up the occasion, “It’s a very sad day. A genius has passed”.  He was laid to rest in the Woodlawn Cemetery, The Bronx, New York City.  His reputation increased after his death and the Pulitzer Prize Board bestowed on him a special posthumous honor in 1999.

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Duke Ellington in 1973

VIDEO: Duke Ellington Live in Harlem “Take The A Train” (1964) features Ernie Shepard on vocals.

VIDEO: Duke Ellington – It Don’t Mean A Thing (1943)

Duke Ellington tribute in ‘Cotton Club Parade’

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By HarlemCondoLife
Duke Ellington, Harlem’s famous jazz musician who is honored with a beautiful sculpture at East 110th Street and Fifth Avenue, performed at the Cotton Club in Harlem in the 1920′s and ’30′s. Now City Center’s Encores! series and Jazz at Lincoln Center will pay respect to the jazz great with “Cotton Club Parade,” a tribute to Ellington’s performances. “Cotton Club Parade” will have six performances at City Center this November (Nov. 18 to 22) with musical direction by Wynton Marsalis and featuring the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra.

The series will run every two years, with the next production scheduled at the Rose Theater at Jazz at Lincoln Center during its 2013-14 season. Tickets for “Cotton Club Parade” can be purchased through City Center beginning Aug. 15.

NYC Mayor Bloomberg declares 4/29 Duke Ellington Day

HarlemGuy

dukeMayor Michael R. Bloomberg has declared April 29 Duke Ellington Day in honor of the 110th anniversary of the jazz legends birth. To commemorate his life, The Islands Of The Bahamas are sponsoring a special run of the last surviving 1939 A Train, made famous by Duke Ellingtons signature tune Take the A Train.  

Paul Ellington, members of the Duke Ellington Orchestra and musicians from Music Under New York (MUNY) will perform the iconic song on the mezzanine at 125th Street and St. Nicholas.

All musicians will then board and perform on the historic train as it travels out to JFK in regular service.

Wednesday, April 29, 2009 10 a.m. Remarks and performance by Paul Ellington, The Duke Ellington Orchestra and musicians from MUNY 11 a.m. sharp All Aboard!

A Train departs 125th Street, making express stops 11 a.m. 2 p.m. The A Train runs in revenue service and is open to the public

125th Street and St. Nicholas A Train (IND) Subway Station.

Sponsors include the Islands of The Bahamas, one of Duke Ellingtons favorite haunts and home of the famous Cat and Fiddle Club in Nassau where top Jazz musicians from around the world entertained in the 50s and 60s.

Click here for more information.

See our blog’s sidebar to purchase a copy of “Take The A Train” on iTunes