Tag Archives: Michaela Angela Davis

QUOTE: On finding out who you are (Michaela Angela Davis)

Michaela Angela Davis HarlemCondoLife

This week’s quote is a short but impactful and critically important video from Michaela Angela Davis – image activist, writer, conversationalist, editorial director, feminist, fashionista, community servant, and CNN contributor.

No summary of ours could do her poetic words any kind of justice.  

Just listen.  Reflect.  And share with the loved ones in your lives.   

Michaela Angela Davis: Who Are You? | Chic Rebellion.

A Talk with Anthony Bourdain and Albert Maysles featuring Marcus Samuelsson – TONIGHT

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The Maysles Documentary Center in association with Zero Point Zero Production and The New York Society for Ethical Culture is proud to present a conversation about film and food with Anthony Bourdain and Albert Maysles, moderated by Michaela Angela Davis and featuring special guest Marcus Samuelsson. We will feature clips from legendary documentary filmmaker Albert Maysles’ genre defining work in film, and Emmy award winning chef, author and travel journalist Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown television series. Join us as the two speak about the art of auteur filmmaking, serendipitous dining, and how cameras connect diverse peoples around the globe. All proceeds to benefit the Maysles Documentary Center.

A Note on Tickets:
Tickets are available for the event only at $65.00 by selecting 7:30pm Wed, Dec. 11th below.

Tickets are available for the pre-reception and the event for $125.00 by selecting 6:00pm, on Wed. Dec. 11th below.

Tickets available HERE.

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Michaela Angela Davis interviewed by Soledad O’Brian for new CNN series Who Is Black In America?

I was so proud to see my friend and Image Activist Michaela Angela Davis interviewed by Soledad O’Brien for CNN’s new series “Who Is Black In America?: Soledad O’Brien Explores Racial Identity”

In this clip Michaela asks one of the seminal questions of our time.

(VIDEO)

I have forever contemplated similar questions.  I am black but of mixed race and born and raised in America.

I was born at the intersection of two lineages. One black one white.  Different countries of origin.  Languages.  Economic status.  Professions.  Political systems.  And so on.   All of this informed me as a person.

My mother and aunt married my father and his best friend in the 60s.  Their unions were embraced by both sides of the family from the very first day.   I have never heard, seen or  detected anything to the contrary.

Both families settled in the Chicago neighborhood of Hyde Park just a short walk from the adjoining neighborhood of Kenwood, the former home to President Obama and his family.  Hyde Park was nationally recognized as the most liberal and racially mixed neighborhood in the country.  It also happened to be in one of the most segregated cities in the County.

The fruit of my family’s unions were always in fullest view at Christmas during which adults and kids of all colors – black, white and in between awoke, showered, played, ate, slept together and loved each other.

My parents, aunts and uncles always referred to me and those like me as “mulatto”.   We all considered it a term of endearment until we learned that it had become politically incorrect for some.  But to this day I find it hard to use another word to describe myself and others like me.  Sometimes I simply refuse to use another term and I explain why.

Our families  used the word with a sense of  pride.  That something unique (but not better) had been delivered.    As I grew older I learned to detect two other things in their voices.  A trepidation that we might encounter fear, hate, injustice or even violence.   Moreover, the  hope, belief and resolve that we represented that which should be accepted without question.  That we represent  and would define the future.

As I grew up and went to college I  learned what it meant to be black and I learned the answer to Angela’s question in the video – “why don’t you think black is enough? ”  My answer.

It is.

Sundae Sermon August 26th!

Sundae Sermon is back this coming Sunday August 26th at 2 – 7pm.  We are very happy to hear that it will be held in Morningside Park at it’s usual location.  This Sunday will feature DJ MKL, DJ Tommy Bones, DJ Des Uno alongside DJ Stormin’ Norman.  Located on Morningside Drive (upper level) and 114th Street Harlem, New York.  Just look for the large crowd listening and dancing to great soulful house, classics and afroBeats… you’ll find it.

Bring a picnic basket and your family your friends or come by yourself, this event is for everyone.  Last Sundae Sermon in July was very crowded and I assume this one will be to, so if you want to set up a spot on the lawn come early.

Sundae Sermon July 2012

Hope to see you all there.  A big shout out to Stormin’ Norman and his ongoing efforts to make this #1 family afternoon party happen for our Harlem community.  Let’s all go celebrate!