Tag Archives: Minton’s Playouse

Sunday Jazz Corner with Danny Mixon (Harlem)

danny mixon pic48814_100001830898559_2782085_n

Daniel Asbury Mixon from Harlem, New York City is an American jazz Pianist.
Currently you can hear him at the newly revised and highly sought upon Jazz Supper Club Minton’s in Harlem.
A prolific piano virtuoso who has performed in the U. S. and Internationally, Daniel Asbury Mixon was born on August 19, 1949 in Harlem and raised in Brooklyn, New York. Growing up in a musical household he was influenced by his mother and grandparents beginning his early artistic expression at the age of 3. He studied and performed as a tap dancer at the Ruth Williams Dance Studio and even then was known as “The Show Stopper.” Danny attended the High School of Performing Arts with dance as his major.

During an afternoon outing at the Apollo Theatre with his grandfather Danny was inspired by the jazz musicians he heard. It was then that he decided that he would like to be a pianist and he never once looked back.

In May of 2004 Danny was one of the first musicians to be honored by the National Jazz Museum in Harlem in a series entitled “Harlem Speaks,” which resulted in an invitation to the White House for Black Music Month on June 22nd.

Danny’s greatest joy is performing, composing, and arranging for his own group “The Danny Mixon Trio or Quartet,” Danny is currently the Musical Director at Minton’s.

This kind of talent doesn’t grow on trees.  Danny Mixon and all of the jazz musicians at Minton’s are what makes Harlem so great.  If you have not yet visited Minton’s Supper Club in Harlem, and you are a lover of good food and REAL JAZZ, we highly recommend it.   See our previous write up on Minton’s Supper Club, Harlem’s Opening Night at Minton’s

DannyMixon.com

Minton’s Harlem

The Danny Mixon Trio Live at Showman’s Jazz Organ Club

The Legendary Minton’s Supper Club to open again in Harlem

a_560x375

Photo: Melissa Hom

A return to elegance in the historic village of Harlem.  The day has come for Minton’s to open officially to the public Monday, October 21st.  The Cecil next door and jointly owned just opened last month with a bang and hasn’t stopped since.  Already considered in a league of it’s own in this area.  See our previous write up on The Cecil Restaurant in Harlem (Review).

We look forward to celebrating the reopening of Minton’s with such a past history of Harlem’s jazz greats when it was once called Minton’s Playhouse.  This venue will require that men wear jackets.  The attire (dress code) is formal and it will be nice to see women and men fill the room with a diversity of styles while enjoying live jazz music.  A very timely decision to open (reopen) this historic jazz club with Harlem on the pulse now more than ever in the New York scene.

Looking forward to experiencing Minton’s next week.  Dress to impress and come out to enjoy good jazz and what looks like to be great food.  Take a peek at the menu below.

Here are a couple photos of entrees you can expect from the menu.  Looking forward to trying the Rib-Eye steak.  Minton’s MENU.

a_560x375-2

Photo: Melissa Hom – Wagyu Rib-eye with bone

a_560x375-1

Photo: Melissa Hom – Crisp Skate Wing with Manila Clams

Minton’s Supper Club
206 West 118th Street
New York, New York 10026
(212) 243-2222
www.mintonsharlem.com

*Photos from Grub Street and Minton’s Facebook Page.

Sunday Jazz Corner with Duke Ellington

Duke-Ellington-9286338-1-402

Duke Ellington’s last words were, “Music is how I live, why I live and how I will be remembered”.  He was an American composer, pianist, and jazz-orchestra leader with a career that spanned more than 50 years.  Ellington led his orchestra from 1923 until his death.  He was born  April 29, 1899 and passed along on May 24, 1974.  He was known as a key participant of  the Harlem Renaissance era and his legacy lives on in Harlem and all around the world.

For this post I chose two video performances “Take The A Train” live in Harlem 1964, and a video of Ellington and his band performing “It Don’t Mean A Thing” back in 1943.

Duke Ellington married his high school sweetheart, Edna Thompson, on July 2, 1918, when he was 19.  Shortly after their marriage, on March 11, 1919 Edna gave birth to their only son, Mercer Kennedy Ellington.  Ellington was joined in New York City by his wife and son in the late twenties, but the couple soon permanently separated.  According to her obituary in Jet magazine, she was “homesick for Washington” and returned (she died in 1967).  In 1938 he met and moved in with Cotton Club employee Beatrice “Evie” Ellis, who with with him during his Cotton Club years in Harlem.  The relationship with Ellis, though stormy, continued after Ellington met Fernandae de Castro Monte in the early 1960s. Ellington supported both women for the rest of his life.

At his funeral, attended by over 12,000 people at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in Harlem, Ella Fitzgerald summed up the occasion, “It’s a very sad day. A genius has passed”.  He was laid to rest in the Woodlawn Cemetery, The Bronx, New York City.  His reputation increased after his death and the Pulitzer Prize Board bestowed on him a special posthumous honor in 1999.

350px-Duke_Ellington_1

Duke Ellington in 1973

VIDEO: Duke Ellington Live in Harlem “Take The A Train” (1964) features Ernie Shepard on vocals.

VIDEO: Duke Ellington – It Don’t Mean A Thing (1943)