September 24th, 2015 by INtoHarlem

https://soundcloud.com/n8tivejrob/67-orange-street?utm_source=soundcloud&utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=fa

J.R.O.B. is an artist out of Chicago who is making his name known here in NYC.  He’s refreshing –  someone who brings high-level musicality and intelligence to his deeply personal views of the world and his own life experiences.  He’s authentic, and is never predictable.  Every song he makes is a journey full of surprises, driving beats, along with a true, relevant message.

J.R.O.B. was in Harlem at 67 Orange recently, and the atmosphere, of this wonderful, historical speakeasy inspired him to write the above account of his life experiences that led him to the moment he experienced there.  He was staying at Aloft Harlem at the time, where the song was written. I asked him how it all came about:  67 Orange Street is a personal record that was sculpted at the Aloft Hotel in Harlem during a dark period of time in my life. ..the song was inspired by 67 Orange, a quaint, cozy little speakeasy that was invisible to the average eye on Frederick Douglass Blvd. in Harlem. Its array of beautifully prepared, classy and tasteful specialty cocktails, and southern style chicken served as a source of comfort during an already difficult time. The hook was created as a way of saying that I will not go down without a fight. I will remain powerful even in my darkest days.

So my friends, you heard it here.  Keep an eye out for J.R.O.B.  He is destined to achieve high levels of success.  He’ll return to the city soon.  I’ll keep you posted about his upcoming shows.  Please know that the above song contains a little adult content.  Enjoy, and please let me know what you think!

 

 

Posted in HarlemCondoLife Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , ,

July 26th, 2013 by harlemhouse

Kids helping Kids is a youth program where children are taught humanity through hip hop.  Listen to the explanation on “why hip hop” by Founder and CEO “Chad Harper” of Hip Hop Saves Lives and learn more about this organization and their upcoming appearance at Carnegie Hall.

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LET’S TAKE IT HIGHER!

Hip Hop was birthed out of a gang truce in the South Bronx that happened on Dec. 8th 1971. This gang truce was celebrated weekly as all the gangs would come together and party in honor of the peace. A gang called The Ghetto Brothers which was formed as a gang to create peace was behind this treaty and weekly parties. The Ghetto Brothers were also a live band and performed each week at the celebrations. From these parties the culture of Hip Hop woud be born. Kool Herc began DJing on Aug 11th 1973 which is Hip Hop’s official birthday. Kool Herc is credited as the father of Hip Hop because he extended the break beat by playing two of the same record and looping the break beat over and over. This he called the Merry-go-round. This dj technique is what created Break dancing or what the original Hip Hop heads call Breakin’. The extended break beat ignited dance battles and crews formed to compete. As the word spread of the new dj and dance style DJ Kool Herc’s parties became the most popular in the Bronx. He then got a microphone and began to give shout outs to his friens and local celebrites at the parties. This was the birth of the MC or rapper. This addition would transform the community culture of celebrating peace to a music form that would cirlce the globe!
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My name is Chad Harper. Founder and CEO of Hip Hop Saves Lives, a non-profit organization that teaches humanity through Hip Hop by celebrating the works of everyday heroes around the globe through songs and videos. My brother Johwell St-Cilien founded an organization called Negus World. Negus means KING in an ethiopean language. His organization is a self empowerment movement around the world. Johwell also was a dancer and became a well known videograher in the dance community in NYC. We came together to create a youth program entitled KIDS HELPING KIDS; A HIP HOP EXPERIENCE. In this program we don’t just teach humanity through Hip Hop we create young humanitarians.
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To celebrate Hip Hop’s 40th birthday we are taking Hip Hop’s original principles of PEACE LOVE UNITY AND HAVIN’ FUN which were outlined by the God Father of Hip Hop Afrika Bambaataa and going to Carnegie Hall for our youth to perform their intelligent music created in our program honoring everyday heroes. Hip Hop is American roots music so our youth will be joined on stage by world roots bands Brown Rice Family and Zing Experience.
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This event is important to show our youth and youth around the world that there is a stage and most importantly an audience for intelligent music.
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People around the world have their expressed dissapointment concerning the current state of hip hop for its negative language and actions towards its own community. THis current music is NOT what Hip Hop was founded on and we are here to take back the name Hip Hop and educate on the difference between Hip Hop and Rap music. One can rap about what ever they like and create Rap music but Hip Hop was founded on a peace treaty that created unity and expressed love, all while having fun!
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If you love the true principles of Hip Hop and feel it’s important for the youth to have a tool that they love and can use to express themselves positively, then we need your support. We all know the power and influence of Hip Hop. We must make sure it continues to do what it was intended to do. We will see you at Carnegie Hall.
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*Please help to spread the word about Hip Hop Saves Lives by tweeting, reposting or sharing this information within your community. You can also help by going to their Event Link NOW and buy a t-shirt or more to help the kids program to perform this November 3rd at Carnegie Hall.

Posted in Community, Culture, Education, Entertainment, Event, Harlem, History, Music, New York City Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

June 16th, 2013 by harlemhouse

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Gil Scott-Heron was a jazz and soul, musician, and author, known for his work as a spoken word performer in the 1970s and 1980s.  With a wide range of diverse fans he delivered in both rapping and melismatic vocal styles.  He referred to himself as a “bluesologist”, which he defined as “a scientist who is concerned with the origin of the blues.”

After a 16 year stretch he recorded his last album released in 2010 entitled  I’m New Here.  A memoir he had been working on for years up to the time of his death, April 27, 2011.  In looking through his video footage today, I chose one in particular besides Gils obvious talent and the amazing Midnight Band, was because of something he said before he starts his performance at the half way point in the video.  He said “Every once in awhile I have gone into record stores lately and found our music in a category called miscellaneous.  Bothered the hell out of me.  Folks are often to anxious to put things into various little compartments.  To often they are to anxious to sweep certain sorts of music under the corner of the rug.  We find that this is particularly true with music that they refer to as jazz.”

Update: This video was deleted unfortunately on youtube,  so I have reposted two more videos instead.  The first one is Gil Scott-Heron “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised” an excellent 60 minute documentary.  The second one is Gil Scott-Heron  “Is That Jazz” performed live.

Check out Gil Scott-Heron’s last album “I’m New Here” on  iTunes MUSIC.  And while you are there browse and listen to all of his work and you will understand why he became a cult classic and an inspiration for many new artists.

Posted in Art and Culture, Central Harlem, East Harlem, Education, Harlem, History, Music, New York City, Sunday Jazz Corner, West Harlem Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

March 6th, 2013 by harlemcondolife

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This is how you stop the Harlem Shake… LOL.  This is the best one yet by far.  I keep saying I will stop posting, but couldn’t resist.  Thanks jl3sport for sending it to Harlem Condo Life.

Enjoy Harlem!

Click Here – THIS IS HOW YOU STOP THE HARLEM SHAKE Screen Shot 2013-03-06 at 4.59.22 PM

See our previous Harlem Shake posts –

How To Do The Harlem Shake – A Brief Tutorial                                                      Harlem re-claims the Harlem Shake
The Harlem Shake from a Business Perspective
John O’s Harlem Shake Down – Rapper responds to the Harlem Shake

Posted in Apollo Theater, Movies Cinema Film Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

February 21st, 2013 by harlemcondolife

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Harlem born and raised rapper/actor John O responds in his own blunt words to the new ‘Harlem Shake’ viral craze.  Keeping it real he says “The song sucks, the video sucks and as a person from Harlem I’m a little bit offended by this because people from all around the world think that’s how you do the Harlem Shake, and it’s not.”

I disagree with him on the song I think Baauer’s track is a good electronic, dubstep track that definitely got peoples attention.  I also think some of the ‘Harlem Shake 2013’ videos out there are funny (See our previous post – Harlem Shake Tutorial.)  

Every day there are more videos popping up on YouTube from all around the globe.  There have been a lot of people reacting in Harlem  lately as you may have seen in this video Harlem Reacts to ‘Harlem Shake’ Videos where a variety of Harlem locals are interviewed on 125th Street.  This video was made by Chris McGuire and went out to all the bloggers and NY media 2 days ago and already has 2,473,925 views and counting.  

That being said, John says what most of us and probably everybody in Harlem are thinking in his video response to the Harlem Shake.

keeping it 100 percent with John O, check out his video response here.                                  THE HARLEM SHAKE DOWN CLICK ON THIS LINK
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Posted in Entertainment, Free!, Harlem, Movies Cinema Film, Music, New York City, TV & Video Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

December 2nd, 2012 by HarlemGuy

Looking for that perfect gift for family and friends? Browse HarlemCondoLife’s new on-line store. New items will be added regularly so keep this page bookmarked and visit it often.

“Give Harlem for the Holidays!”

Posted in Books, Food, Harlem, Music, New York City, shopping Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

October 1st, 2011 by tharealharlemista

by thaRealHarlemista

Whether you love or hate rap, you cannot deny its influence on our popular music and lives today. And Friday, rap lost a true pioneer in Sylvia Robinson, a singer, songwriter and record producer who formed and oversaw the seminal hip-hop group Sugarhill Gang and made the first commercially successful rap recording with them.

Ms Robinson, who had hits as part of 1950’s R&B duo Mickey and Sylvia, and alone in 1973 (the song ” Pillow Talk”) and who owned a record label with her husband, was celebrating her birthday in 1979 in the famous Harlem World nightclub on 116th and Lenox  (now the Conway discount store) when she heard MC Lovebug Starski rapping over disco breaks in instrumental songs and thought it would be a good idea to make a rap record. Employing her son as a talent scout, they found three young workers in a Jersey pizza parlor and persuaded them to improvise rhymes over a 15 minute Chic disco track.

That song, “Rapper’s Delight” reached No. 4 on the R&B charts and No. 36 on Billboard’s Hot 100, opening the flood gates for other hip-hop artists. Ms. Robinson later signed Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five, and in 1982 she was a producer of their ground shattering social awareness song, “The Message.”, arguably the greatest rap song ever recorded.

In an all-too-often male dominated genre, the influence of this woman cannot be denied.  RIP Sylvia Robinson.

Posted in Harlem Tagged with: , , ,

May 30th, 2011 by harlemhouse

By HarlemHouse
Gil Scott-Heron, poet and musician, has died at 62.  A Harlem resident and neighbor who resided on East 112th street who was  considered by many as the Godfather of Rap.  He died on May 27, 2011 on Friday afternoon in New York.  He became sick after a European trip.  Credited with being one of  the progenitors of hip hop, and is best known for the spoken-word piece “The Revolution Will Not Be Televised.”  Like many other music greats he struggled with substance abuse but continued to share his music and talent throughout the years.  One of his recent projects “I’m New Here” released in February 2010 was received with much critical acclaim.  http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/im-new-here-bonus-track-version/id351170362

Here is an excerpt from a video clip of Gil-Scott in his own words…. (from Racialicious by Arturo on May 28, 2011)

“The catchphrase, what that was all about, ‘The Revolution Will Not Be Televised,’ that was about the fact that the first change that takes place is in your mind. You have to change your mind before you change the way you live and the way you move. So when we said that ‘The Revolution Will Not Be Televised,’ we were saying that the thing that’s gonna change people is something that no one will ever be able to capture on film. It will just be something that you see, and all of a sudden you realize I’m on the wrong page, or I’m on the right page but I’m on the wrong note, and I’ve got to get in sync with everyone else to understand what’s happening in this country.

But I think that the Black Americans have been the only die-hard Americans here, because we’re the only ones who carried the process through the process that everyone else has to sort of skip stages. We’re the ones who march, we’re the ones who carry the Bible, we’re the ones who carry the flag, we’re the ones who have to go through the courts, and being born American didn’t seem to matter, because we were born American, but we still had to fight for what we were looking for, and we still had to go through those channels and those processes.”
– Mediaburn, 1991

Rest in Peace.  Gil Scott-Heron will be missed.

 

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