Tag Archives: Harlem Jazz

What Are The Top World Music Venues in Harlem

We agree with theculturetrip.com’s review which includes all our favorites including Minton’s Harlem, Silvana, Ginny’s Supper Club, The Shrine, and the Apollo Theater.


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Sunday Jazz Corner with Jimmie Lunceford

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James Melvin “Jimmie” Lunceford (June 6, 1902 – July 12, 1947) was an American Jazz alto saxophonist and bandleader in the swing era.

Jimmie Lunceford is the odd man out in jazz history. This bandleader made no waves with his musicianship – his preferred instrument was the conductor’s baton – and he possessed neither the elegance of Ellington nor the hipster hauteur of Calloway. But Lunceford knew how to entertain an audience, and he led one of the finest jazz bands of the 1930s. When Lunceford’s ensemble took a booking at the Cotton Club, following in the footsteps of Cab and the Duke, dancers would hardly have missed a beat. “Harlem Shout” demonstrates the core virtues of this orchestra: its swinging riff-based charts, its hot and polished section work, and (another calling card of Lunceford’s bands) high-note trumpet theatrics, provided here by Paul Webster. Like a hearty band of soldiers, this ensemble always maintained discipline under fire, and there was inevitably plenty of hot stuff around when folks like Sy Oliver and Eddie Durham were handing out the parts. Perhaps if Lunceford had lived longer – he died, reportedly of a heart attack (although under suspicious circumstances), at age 45 – he might have been fêted as elder statesman of jazz. But, as it stands, he is little more than a half-remembered name for most younger jazz fans. Tis pity, ’cause this band was sublime.  Reviewer Credit: Ted Gioia

Read Wikipedia on Jimmie Lunceford stating rumors about his death (suspicious circumstances) that he was actually poisoned in Seaside, Oregon by a restaurant owner.

Tain’t What You Do – Jimmie Lunceford

Jimmie Lunceford and His Dance Orchestra 1936 (LIVE)

Harlem Shout – Jimmie Lunceford Orchestra

Sunday Jazz Corner With Etta James

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The one and only Etta James.  It is sad to think we have just only recently lost Etta James (born Jamesetta Hawkins)  on January 20, 2012.  She was born January 25, 1938 and she died five days before her birthday on which she would have been 74 years old.  James was known as an American singer-songwriter.  Her style spanned a variety of music genres including blues, jazz, R&B, soul, rock and gospel.  Whenever anyone thinks of the jazz classic “At Last” they think of Etta James.  Etta’s version as compared to versions by other jazz singers, belonged to her.

James was married to her husband Artis Mills, whom she married in 1969.  They had two sons, Donto and Sametto.  Both started performing with their mother — Donto played drums at Montreux in 1993, and Sametto played bass guitar circa 2003 with his mom.  Etta James battled with Heroin addiction for years and her husband Mr. Mills served a 10-year prison sentence for heroin possession.

From 1989, James received over 30 awards and recognitions from eight different organizations, including the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum and the Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences which organizes the Grammys.

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Now perhaps more trendy than ever Etta James is a “cult hero” with producers and remixers waiting in line to remix her legendary sound and style.  We continue to hear her though samples in rap, hip hop, electronic and pop music of today.  Her legacy lives on through blues and jazz singers in clubs worldwide honoring her sound.  Here she is singing “At Last” as only she could.  And the second video is of a young Etta James singing “Got A Hold On Me.”

At Last (live) [VIDEO] – Etta James

Somethings Got A Hold On Me (Live) [VIDEO] – Etta James

“BLUE SKIES” (New Harlem Meets Old Jazz) MIX

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It’s been awhile since our last podcast but we are happy to say that Blue Skies (Vol. 1) is now ready for FREE DOWNLOAD on iTunes for your listening pleasure.  On this mix you can expect to hear a few modern day remixers from trap to club mixed together with old jazz classics.  Including a spoken word intro from “Lady Sings The Blues” soundtrack, the Billie Holiday story.  Also a spoken word jazz remix of Ursula Rucker and a beautiful track by Meshell Ndegeocello – Four Women (Pour use ame souveraine) –  a dedication to Nina Simone.

See the full playlist below.  Pour yourself a cup of coffee, a martini or glass of wine and enjoy some classic jazz with new remixes that will get your party started right.

DOWNLOAD: Blue Skies (New Harlem Meets Old Jazz) Vol. 1

PLAYLIST -

1. Intro – Billie Sneaks Into Dean & Dean’s / Swingin’ Uptown
2. Ain’t Nobody’s Business – Billie Holiday
3. God Bless The Child (Remix Edit) – Billie Holiday
4. Corcovado (TOKiMONSTA Remix) Getz & Gilberto
5. Supa Sista (Society Nu’mericana Jazz Mix) – Ursula Rucker
6. Georgia On My Mind (Brown Stone Mix) – Ray Charles
7. I Love…Dub (Edit) – Funky DL
8. I’ve Got You Under My Skin (DJ Carnage & Victor Niglio Mix) – Dinah Washington
9. Bei mir bist du schon (Dub) – Waldeck
10. Avenue du Gare (Martini Dub Mix) – Tape Five
11. Four Women (Dedication to Nina Simone) – Meshell Ndegeocello
12. Blue Skies (Maya Jane Coles Mix) – Ella Fitzgerald
13. My Man – Billie Holiday
14. My Man (Toro Y Moi Dub Mix) – Billie Holiday
15. So Nice (Summer Samba) (Azari & Ill Mix) – Astrud Gilberto
16. Haunted Town (Remix Edit) – Lena Horne
17. Bodysnatchin’ (On the Isle) – Rubberoom
18. Right Here – DJ Mitsu
19. Fly Me To The Moon (Kaskade Remix) – Astrud Gilberto
20. Tequila (Pistel Remix) – The Champs
21. Mama Guela (STUHR Remix) – Tito Rodriguez
22. Don’t Let Me Be Misunderstood (Zeds Dead Remix) – Nina Simone
23. Feeling Good (Bassnectar Dub Edit) – Nina Simone
24. All Night – Billa Quase
25. Just Move (Remix Edit) – Uneeq