Tag Archives: Harlem Jazz



Brianna will bring her lively, very entertaining show to Ginny’s Supper Club tonight. This is a great early show choice.  I love her dynamic delivery of jazz.  She’s soulful, very skilled and just plain fun.  Show is from 7:30 – 9:30 this evening at Ginny’s Supper Club, downstairs from Red Rooster Harlem.


Thursday Nights Pop in Harlem


Han at Silvana


I love the flavor that Silvana brings to Harlem.  This is the third establishment offered by owners of Yatenga French Bistro and Shrine World Music Venue.  Silvana offers a fresh variety of musical talent tonight.  It’s worth checking out the vibe and spirits there while you take in any of the below performances.

6-8pm: Franco Pinna -McBone Jazz Series

8-9pm: Han – Folk Pop Singer Songwriter

9-10pm: Bugs & Crumbs – Indie Rock

10-11pm: Taulant Mehmeti Funk Project

11pm-12am: Pandafan – Indie Folk

12-3:45am: DJ Natt from Japan

Silvana is located at 300 W. 116th Street
(SW corner of Frederick Douglass Blvd/8th)






Settepani offers the extraordinary talent of Rodney Green tonight during their Ode to Harlem series.  He’s an incredibly astute drummer with an equally high level band.  It’s a lovely experience to indulge any of Settepani’s delectable offerings, and it’s a perfect match for the music of Mr. Green.  Show tonight is from 7:00 to 10:00 pm.

Find Settepani at 196 Lenox Avenue @ 120th Street







Nicole Henry Comes to Ginny’s

Ginnys Nicole Henry

You must not miss 2013 Soul Train Awards winner Nicole Henry at Ginny’s Supper Club this weekend, September 25th & 26th.  Ms. Henry will light up the room with her pristine, soulful expression, and her always swinging band.  Her rendition of Bill Withers’ “Use Me” is one of my favorites.

Get your tickets, catch one or more of the shows and let me know what you think!


Sunday Jazz Corner with Jimmie Lunceford

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James Melvin “Jimmie” Lunceford (June 6, 1902 – July 12, 1947) was an American Jazz alto saxophonist and bandleader in the swing era.

Jimmie Lunceford is the odd man out in jazz history. This bandleader made no waves with his musicianship – his preferred instrument was the conductor’s baton – and he possessed neither the elegance of Ellington nor the hipster hauteur of Calloway. But Lunceford knew how to entertain an audience, and he led one of the finest jazz bands of the 1930s. When Lunceford’s ensemble took a booking at the Cotton Club, following in the footsteps of Cab and the Duke, dancers would hardly have missed a beat. “Harlem Shout” demonstrates the core virtues of this orchestra: its swinging riff-based charts, its hot and polished section work, and (another calling card of Lunceford’s bands) high-note trumpet theatrics, provided here by Paul Webster. Like a hearty band of soldiers, this ensemble always maintained discipline under fire, and there was inevitably plenty of hot stuff around when folks like Sy Oliver and Eddie Durham were handing out the parts. Perhaps if Lunceford had lived longer – he died, reportedly of a heart attack (although under suspicious circumstances), at age 45 – he might have been fêted as elder statesman of jazz. But, as it stands, he is little more than a half-remembered name for most younger jazz fans. Tis pity, ’cause this band was sublime.  Reviewer Credit: Ted Gioia

Read Wikipedia on Jimmie Lunceford stating rumors about his death (suspicious circumstances) that he was actually poisoned in Seaside, Oregon by a restaurant owner.

Tain’t What You Do – Jimmie Lunceford

Jimmie Lunceford and His Dance Orchestra 1936 (LIVE)

Harlem Shout – Jimmie Lunceford Orchestra