November 6th, 2013 by HarlemGuy

Kita4EVG

Congratulations to Bill de Blasio and New York City’s new First Family.  We are looking forward to the inauguration and welcoming Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio.  It is important to have diversity at the top.

Mr. de Blasio is currently holding the citywide office of New York City Public Advocate, which serves as an ombudsman between the electorate and the city government.  He formerly served as a New York City Council member representing the 39th District in Brooklyn (Borough Park, Carroll Gardens, Cobble Hill, Gowanus, Kensington, Park Slope and Winter Terrace.)

bill-de-blasio-family

Posted in business, Community, Culture, Education, HarlemCondoLife, History, New York City, Politics Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

August 1st, 2013 by harlemhouse

hfb_invite2

Save the date Wednesday, August 7th from 6:00 to 8:00 pm, Harlem Food Bar will be hosting a Fundraiser for Vince Morgan / Democrat for NYC Council.   To find out more on Vince Morgan please check out his website www.vincemorgan.com.

If you would like to meet Vince in person  and get to know his views and positions, stop by Harlem Food Bar Wednesday night.  A $25 minimum contribution is suggested.  See you there!

Harlem Food Bar
2100 Frederick Douglass Blvd
New York, NY 10026

Posted in business, Community, Event, Food, Harlem, Menu Harlem Restaurant Row, New York City, Politics, Restaurant Reviews, Restaurants, South Harlem (SOHA) Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , ,

July 21st, 2013 by HarlemGuy

Barack Obama HarlemCondoLife

President Obama’s remarks on Trayvon Martin gave voice to a reality that continues to impact the Harlem community and all across the country.    His message was was powerful, poignant and personal.   We are sharing the message in the hopes that everyone takes a moment to really take in what he said.   And to reflect on what each of us can do to deliver change.

Office of the Press Secretary
For Immediate Release
July 19, 2013
Remarks by the President on Trayvon Martin
James S. Brady Press Briefing Room

1:33 P.M. EDT

THE PRESIDENT: I wanted to come out here, first of all, to tell you that Jay is prepared for all your questions and is very much looking forward to the session. The second thing is I want to let you know that over the next couple of weeks, there’s going to obviously be a whole range of issues — immigration, economics, et cetera — we’ll try to arrange a fuller press conference to address your questions.

The reason I actually wanted to come out today is not to take questions, but to speak to an issue that obviously has gotten a lot of attention over the course of the last week — the issue of the Trayvon Martin ruling. I gave a preliminary statement right after the ruling on Sunday. But watching the debate over the course of the last week, I thought it might be useful for me to expand on my thoughts a little bit.

First of all, I want to make sure that, once again, I send my thoughts and prayers, as well as Michelle’s, to the family of Trayvon Martin, and to remark on the incredible grace and dignity with which they’ve dealt with the entire situation. I can only imagine what they’re going through, and it’s remarkable how they’ve handled it.

The second thing I want to say is to reiterate what I said on Sunday, which is there’s going to be a lot of arguments about the legal issues in the case — I’ll let all the legal analysts and talking heads address those issues. The judge conducted the trial in a professional manner. The prosecution and the defense made their arguments. The juries were properly instructed that in a case such as this reasonable doubt was relevant, and they rendered a verdict. And once the jury has spoken, that’s how our system works. But I did want to just talk a little bit about context and how people have responded to it and how people are feeling.

You know, when Trayvon Martin was first shot I said that this could have been my son. Another way of saying that is Trayvon Martin could have been me 35 years ago. And when you think about why, in the African American community at least, there’s a lot of pain around what happened here, I think it’s important to recognize that the African American community is looking at this issue through a set of experiences and a history that doesn’t go away.

There are very few African American men in this country who haven’t had the experience of being followed when they were shopping in a department store. That includes me. There are very few African American men who haven’t had the experience of walking across the street and hearing the locks click on the doors of cars. That happens to me — at least before I was a senator. There are very few African Americans who haven’t had the experience of getting on an elevator and a woman clutching her purse nervously and holding her breath until she had a chance to get off. That happens often.

And I don’t want to exaggerate this, but those sets of experiences inform how the African American community interprets what happened one night in Florida. And it’s inescapable for people to bring those experiences to bear. The African American community is also knowledgeable that there is a history of racial disparities in the application of our criminal laws — everything from the death penalty to enforcement of our drug laws. And that ends up having an impact in terms of how people interpret the case.

Now, this isn’t to say that the African American community is naïve about the fact that African American young men are disproportionately involved in the criminal justice system; that they’re disproportionately both victims and perpetrators of violence. It’s not to make excuses for that fact — although black folks do interpret the reasons for that in a historical context. They understand that some of the violence that takes place in poor black neighborhoods around the country is born out of a very violent past in this country, and that the poverty and dysfunction that we see in those communities can be traced to a very difficult history.

And so the fact that sometimes that’s unacknowledged adds to the frustration. And the fact that a lot of African American boys are painted with a broad brush and the excuse is given, well, there are these statistics out there that show that African American boys are more violent — using that as an excuse to then see sons treated differently causes pain.

I think the African American community is also not naïve in understanding that, statistically, somebody like Trayvon Martin was statistically more likely to be shot by a peer than he was by somebody else. So folks understand the challenges that exist for African American boys. But they get frustrated, I think, if they feel that there’s no context for it and that context is being denied. And that all contributes I think to a sense that if a white male teen was involved in the same kind of scenario, that, from top to bottom, both the outcome and the aftermath might have been different.

Now, the question for me at least, and I think for a lot of folks, is where do we take this? How do we learn some lessons from this and move in a positive direction? I think it’s understandable that there have been demonstrations and vigils and protests, and some of that stuff is just going to have to work its way through, as long as it remains nonviolent. If I see any violence, then I will remind folks that that dishonors what happened to Trayvon Martin and his family. But beyond protests or vigils, the question is, are there some concrete things that we might be able to do.

I know that Eric Holder is reviewing what happened down there, but I think it’s important for people to have some clear expectations here. Traditionally, these are issues of state and local government, the criminal code. And law enforcement is traditionally done at the state and local levels, not at the federal levels.

That doesn’t mean, though, that as a nation we can’t do some things that I think would be productive. So let me just give a couple of specifics that I’m still bouncing around with my staff, so we’re not rolling out some five-point plan, but some areas where I think all of us could potentially focus.

Number one, precisely because law enforcement is often determined at the state and local level, I think it would be productive for the Justice Department, governors, mayors to work with law enforcement about training at the state and local levels in order to reduce the kind of mistrust in the system that sometimes currently exists.

When I was in Illinois, I passed racial profiling legislation, and it actually did just two simple things. One, it collected data on traffic stops and the race of the person who was stopped. But the other thing was it resourced us training police departments across the state on how to think about potential racial bias and ways to further professionalize what they were doing.

And initially, the police departments across the state were resistant, but actually they came to recognize that if it was done in a fair, straightforward way that it would allow them to do their jobs better and communities would have more confidence in them and, in turn, be more helpful in applying the law. And obviously, law enforcement has got a very tough job.

So that’s one area where I think there are a lot of resources and best practices that could be brought to bear if state and local governments are receptive. And I think a lot of them would be. And let’s figure out are there ways for us to push out that kind of training.

Along the same lines, I think it would be useful for us to examine some state and local laws to see if it — if they are designed in such a way that they may encourage the kinds of altercations and confrontations and tragedies that we saw in the Florida case, rather than diffuse potential altercations.

I know that there’s been commentary about the fact that the “stand your ground” laws in Florida were not used as a defense in the case. On the other hand, if we’re sending a message as a society in our communities that someone who is armed potentially has the right to use those firearms even if there’s a way for them to exit from a situation, is that really going to be contributing to the kind of peace and security and order that we’d like to see?

And for those who resist that idea that we should think about something like these “stand your ground” laws, I’d just ask people to consider, if Trayvon Martin was of age and armed, could he have stood his ground on that sidewalk? And do we actually think that he would have been justified in shooting Mr. Zimmerman who had followed him in a car because he felt threatened? And if the answer to that question is at least ambiguous, then it seems to me that we might want to examine those kinds of laws.

Number three — and this is a long-term project — we need to spend some time in thinking about how do we bolster and reinforce our African American boys. And this is something that Michelle and I talk a lot about. There are a lot of kids out there who need help who are getting a lot of negative reinforcement. And is there more that we can do to give them the sense that their country cares about them and values them and is willing to invest in them?

I’m not naïve about the prospects of some grand, new federal program. I’m not sure that that’s what we’re talking about here. But I do recognize that as President, I’ve got some convening power, and there are a lot of good programs that are being done across the country on this front. And for us to be able to gather together business leaders and local elected officials and clergy and celebrities and athletes, and figure out how are we doing a better job helping young African American men feel that they’re a full part of this society and that they’ve got pathways and avenues to succeed — I think that would be a pretty good outcome from what was obviously a tragic situation. And we’re going to spend some time working on that and thinking about that.

And then, finally, I think it’s going to be important for all of us to do some soul-searching. There has been talk about should we convene a conversation on race. I haven’t seen that be particularly productive when politicians try to organize conversations. They end up being stilted and politicized, and folks are locked into the positions they already have. On the other hand, in families and churches and workplaces, there’s the possibility that people are a little bit more honest, and at least you ask yourself your own questions about, am I wringing as much bias out of myself as I can? Am I judging people as much as I can, based on not the color of their skin, but the content of their character? That would, I think, be an appropriate exercise in the wake of this tragedy.

And let me just leave you with a final thought that, as difficult and challenging as this whole episode has been for a lot of people, I don’t want us to lose sight that things are getting better. Each successive generation seems to be making progress in changing attitudes when it comes to race. It doesn’t mean we’re in a post-racial society. It doesn’t mean that racism is eliminated. But when I talk to Malia and Sasha, and I listen to their friends and I seem them interact, they’re better than we are — they’re better than we were — on these issues. And that’s true in every community that I’ve visited all across the country.

And so we have to be vigilant and we have to work on these issues. And those of us in authority should be doing everything we can to encourage the better angels of our nature, as opposed to using these episodes to heighten divisions. But we should also have confidence that kids these days, I think, have more sense than we did back then, and certainly more than our parents did or our grandparents did; and that along this long, difficult journey, we’re becoming a more perfect union — not a perfect union, but a more perfect union.

Thank you, guys.

END
1:52 P.M. EDT

http://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2013/07/19/president-obama-trayvon-martin-could-have-been-me

Posted in Community, Harlem, New York City, Politics Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , ,

October 15th, 2012 by harlemhouse

Stop the DJ, pause your iPod and for 2 hours Oct 16 at 9pm watch the second Presidential Debate.  If you are looking for a place, Harlem Food Bar will be one of several showing the debate Tuesday at 9PM here in Harlem.  For 2 hours CNN political correspondent Candy Crowley will moderate President Barack Obama and Governor Mitt Romney in this Town Hall style format.

For the first debate I was in Miami and asked a buddy/DJ friend of mine “what bar/lounge is the best place to watch the debate here in South Beach?” he said “Why? nowhere”  He was right we ended up at our hotel lounge which was lacking quite a bit of… shall we say flavor and was mostly routing for… shall we say the other guy.  Needless to say it is great to be back in NYC and specifically Harlem and have as many options as we do to view the debates.  Thanks to places like Harlem Food Bar, Lido’s, The 5 and DiamondCorner Social and other Harlem businesses that help to keep us informed and send the message that this Presidential Election is  an important one for Harlem and for our Country’s future.

Posted in Drink, Food, Harlem, Menu Harlem Restaurant Row, New York City, Politics, Restaurants Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

October 4th, 2012 by harlemhouse

The Presidential election is November 6, 2012.

Pick up Voter Registration forms from select Barber Shops, Libraries, Post Offices, and most NYC Government agencies.

To register to vote In NYC:
Be a citizen of the Unites States.
Be a NYC resident for at least 30 days.
Be 18 years of age before the next election.
Not be serving a jail sentence or be on parole for a felony conviction.
Not be adjudged mentally incompetent by a court.
Not claim the right to vote elsewhere (outside NYC).

The application MUST be postmarked by 10/12/12.

Posted in Community, Harlem, New York City, Politics Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

October 1st, 2012 by harlemhouse

Harlem Food Bar has reached out to Harlem Condo Life to help spread the word that they will be showing all three Presidential Debates this month.  The fun begins this Wednesday, October 3rd at 9PM.  Soon to follow they will host the Second and Third Debate scheduled for 10/16 and 10/22.  This is a fantastic idea and I’m sure other spots in Harlem will join in.

A suggestion since the debates do not start until 9PM is that you might want to have dinner at Harlem Food Bar beforehand.  The owners are in the process of spicing up their fall menu which we will be blogging about later this week.  If you have not tried the food at HFB yet then you should definitely plan an evening their this Wednesday for Dinner and Debates!  I imagine it will be an interesting viewing audience.  Check out their website below and a previous review by HCL.

So stop by this Wednesday night and visit the friendly staff (and owners) of HFB and watch the debate.  Remember your vote is very important!  Every vote counts.  If you have not registered yet, please make sure you register to vote.

Harlem Food Bar will also be having an Election Night Party on Tuesday, November 6th.  More information coming soon.

You can  follow HFB on facebook and twitter.  For more information check out their website HarlemFoodBar

(Review) Harlem Food Bar – A New Spot In Harlem 

Posted in Drink, Food, Harlem, Menu Harlem Restaurant Row, Politics, Restaurants Tagged with: , , , , , , , , ,

September 27th, 2012 by HarlemGuy

20120927-105617.jpg

Ohio State Senator’s recent not to be missed appearance on The Last Word channels sentiments shared by many in Harlem.

*** Show excerpt one ***

O’DONELL: Senator Turner, it`s all about Ohio. We keep saying no Republican
return has every won the presidency without Ohio. What is your sense of
the president`s lead in Ohio right now? It seems to be just outside the
margin of error.

STATE SEN. NINA TURNER (D), OHIO: Well, Lawrence, Ohio is certainly
the heart of it all and we can tell that by the frequent visits by the
president here and by Governor Romney. His team is trying to make up for
their 40 percent.

You know, Republicans have a problem with the 40 percent. Here in the
state of Ohio, our governor once said I don`t need your people. We got
Governor Romney talking about he don`t need those people, and the last time
I checked we were “we the people”. And that`s who the president is
fighting for. We the people in Ohio, we the people in Iowa, we the people
in Wisconsin, we the people all across this country.

And, Lawrence, when Governor Romney has revealed exactly who he is and
we`ve got to believe him that he doesn`t care about the 47 percent in this
nation.

*** Show excerpt two ***

O`DONNELL: Senator Turner, it looks like the Obama campaign just had
to combine the story of Monday of last week with the story of Friday last
week to get what may be the most devastating ad to run in Ohio yet.

TURNER: It is, Lawrence. And I want to shout amen.

Again, Governor Romney has revealed exactly who he is. And I`ve got
to figure that Congressman Ryan probably feels like he`s in a shot gun
wedding right about now. It`s hard to be a partner of the default
candidate.

And make know mistake about it, Governor Romney is the default
candidate of the Republican Party. And I don`t care how they dress it up.
It`s not going to change the fact — and Ohio is not only leaning towards
President Obama, we are right there with President Obama.

We`re going to make sure that we deliver the state of Ohio just as we
did in 2008 and help our president make history again. The president is
standing up for all folks and he doesn`t have to say one thing before
wealthy donors and another thing before poor and working and middle class
folks. He is about building from the middle out and making sure that
everybody has the opportunity to live their measure of the American dream.
We will know the tree by the fruit that it bears and the president has
been bearing righteous fruit to make sure that America is for everybody.

View the full video here.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/45755883/vp/49173345#49173345

Posted in Harlem, Politics, Quote Tagged with: , , , , , , ,

September 18th, 2012 by harlemhouse

“My job is not to worry about the 47 percent.  My job is to be President of the 53 percent.”

– Mitt Romney

 

* Register to vote, the 47 percent need to be heard.  Please vote this year our future depends on it.

Posted in Quote Tagged with: , , , , , , , , ,

July 13th, 2012 by HarlemGuy
Harlem Condo Life Twitter

HarlemCondoLife.com @HarlemHCL

Please follow HarlemCondoLife on twitter @HarlemHCL

Keep up on the latest news and what’s happening in our village of Harlem.

Harlem Condo Life “Your Gateway to Harlem.”

 

Posted in Harlem Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

June 21st, 2012 by harlemhouse
Live in Harlem? Love Harlem? Then you need to be here…TONIGHT!
Get involved.
Help Clyde make our Harlem better!

Live in Harlem? Love Harlem? Then you need to be here… TONIGHT! Get involved. Help Clyde make our Harlem Better.

Stop by Bleu Violin tonight June 21, 2012 from 6:00PM – 9:00PM to celebrate with Clyde Williams‘ NY Times and NY Daily News Endorsement for District 13 NY. Meet Clyde, the campaign team and volunteers as they prepare to push towards June 26th.

Bleu Violin is located at 1400 Fifth Avenue at 116th Street. There will be a DJ and Open Bar for the first hour 6PM – 7PM.

Get your vote on! Lets get involved!

See you tonight.

For more information about Harlem please also see HarlemTrends.

Posted in business, Drink, Entertainment, Free!, Harlem, Music, Politics, Restaurants Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,